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Posted by on May 9, 2015 in Featured Maps, Visualisation | 2 comments

Colour of Votes: 2015 General Election

Colour of Votes: 2015 General Election

There have been many great interactive maps and graphics produced for the 2015 General Election. A map I haven’t seen though is one that attempts to show the relative strength of support for each party in each constituency. This is what the map above seeks to achieve. The principle is simple – you have 3 buckets of paint – one red, one green, one blue – and you mix them together based on the vote share of each party. So a strong Conservative win gets lots of blue paint and relatively little from the other two, whilst split in support across parties will result in a more muddy colour as all three paints get mixed together in similar amounts. As an extra step I also rescaled the size of each area by the number of people who voted there to help show cities, especially London, more clearly. Of course, this map falls a little short of revealing the most interesting results of the election since they mostly occurred in the green...

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Posted by on Oct 21, 2013 in Featured Maps, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 4 comments

Mapping Where We Live

Mapping Where We Live

Showing where we live is, of course, one of the oldest and most useful reasons to create a map. As we bask in the “Big Data” era, the trend for mapping population is increasing simply because there are more data points out there, the bulk of which are generated by people. Population distribution is important because, as xkcd wittily illustrates, if you were to map these points without accounting for it you often just get a population density map. Or worse still, you think you are creating a map that represents the whole world, but instead you only get the parts of  it where people are connected to the internet. Such maps are considered unsurprising by many (in spite of their hype) because simple maps of raw counts rarely offer surprising insights in the phenomena the map is trying to articulate. For examples of this there are some great maps (and data) of Wikipedia entries vs population density here. For this post, however, I want to ignore the many new datasets...

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Posted by on Sep 3, 2013 in London, Video | 1 comment

UK Public Transport Flows

UK Public Transport Flows

Joan Serras from CASA has produced this great animation that demonstrates Britain’s public transport network. It details train, coach, metro (tram and tube), ferry and air trips over a typical weekday in 2009. Different modes of transport are assigned different colours, and time is represented by the clock at the top left. The animation clearly highlights the complexity of the networks, the distinct transport geographies of the UK’s cities and regions, and the daily peaks of...

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Posted by on Nov 28, 2010 in Surnames | 0 comments

Surnames for the Big Chill

Surnames for the Big Chill

Thanks to the jet stream, many parts of the UK have just had the coldest November night on record. During these extreme weather events we become especially interested in weather maps and, of course, the #uksnow map is busier than ever. In such times we often talk about Jack Frost, but what about Mr Blizzard or Ms Snow?  I have produced a map to show the places you are most likely to find them. If you like the cold perhaps you can thank them; if you don’t, ask nicely and they may be able to arrange some warmer weather. For Carto-Nerds: This map has not been adjusted for the underlying population density of Great Britain, which is why it closely resembles a map of urban areas. The underlying spatial units for the density analysis are Output Area centroids which have been roughly standardised for population. Taking the relative frequency of the name therefore makes little difference (I have tried it). There are some more involved ways of accounting for...

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Posted by on Aug 24, 2010 in London | 1 comment

Sound Maps

Sound Maps

Sound maps are nothing new but they are becoming increasingly popular as technology (such as Google Maps and Audioboo) are making their creation much easier. My interest in these stems from the Sounds Like Leigh-On-Sea project my brother is creating of our hometown (map below). View Sounds Like Leigh-on-Sea in a larger map There are several other larger-scale projects that have caught my eye recently. The London Sound Survey is one of the most mature projects with sounds from most of London, and recent plans to expand east along the Thames Estuary. On a National Scale the Noise Futures Network and British Library have teamed up to create the UK Soundmap with the intention of creating a crowd-sourced soundscape of the UK. It has only recently been launched so there is space for many more contributions! One of my favorite maps is from sonicwonders.org with its “travel guide to sonic wonders‘. Sounds can be rated as ‘worth a journey’, ‘worth a detour’ and ‘interesting’ and it can certainly add...

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