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Posted by on Dec 13, 2010 in Featured Maps, London, Resources, Visualisation | 2 comments

2010: Mapped

2010: Mapped

I have selected 12 maps that capture some of the biggest, most interesting, exciting or newsworthy events over the past year, mainly from the UK. January has a bonus map at the expense of March (I couldn’t think of anything). This list is entirely my own and I am sure people will have plenty of suggestions. Few of the maps are cartographic masterpieces but they have all conveyed a key event to a large audience. January The coldest spell of winter weather for 3 decades. The UK was gripped by Arctic winds and covered in snow. This stunning MODIS image conceals the chaos below. OpenStreetMap Haiti earthquake response. The efforts of the OpenStreetMap community placed the project in many of the national newspapers and served as a fantastic demonstration of the skills and goodwill of the mapping community. OpenStreetMap – Project Haiti from ItoWorld on Vimeo. February 2010 Winter Olympics. Vancouver was short on snow and Team GB brings home its first individual gold medal for over 30 years....

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Posted by on Nov 28, 2010 in Surnames | 0 comments

Surnames for the Big Chill

Surnames for the Big Chill

Thanks to the jet stream, many parts of the UK have just had the coldest November night on record. During these extreme weather events we become especially interested in weather maps and, of course, the #uksnow map is busier than ever. In such times we often talk about Jack Frost, but what about Mr Blizzard or Ms Snow?  I have produced a map to show the places you are most likely to find them. If you like the cold perhaps you can thank them; if you don’t, ask nicely and they may be able to arrange some warmer weather. For Carto-Nerds: This map has not been adjusted for the underlying population density of Great Britain, which is why it closely resembles a map of urban areas. The underlying spatial units for the density analysis are Output Area centroids which have been roughly standardised for population. Taking the relative frequency of the name therefore makes little difference (I have tried it). There are some more involved ways of accounting for...

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Posted by on Jul 8, 2009 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Snowtweets

Snowtweets

Aside from an interest in surnames, I keep an eye on cold-regions research. I spent a lot of time as an undergraduate studying glaciers and became heavily involved in the Polar Science/ Cold Regions research community. Many of the results from this research are extremely relevant as they inform to a large extent the climate change debate. Unfortunately, I often found myself speaking with many researchers who lacked the technical ability and motivation to engage with the public and harness the growing power of Volunteered Geographic Information. I am therefore extremely impressed with the University of Waterloo’s (Canada)Snowtweets Project. The project, inspired by a UK snow map from Ben Marsh, encourages people to measure snow depths in their local area and instantly publish them to the web via Twitter. Snowtweet users can downlo ad a standalone viewer called Snowbird that has been developed with Adobe Flex and Papervision3D.  The use of NASA Visible Earth Imagery, a clean interface and great graphics make this a very compelling application. I hope...

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