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Posted by on Aug 18, 2014 in Featured Maps, Slideshow, Visualisation | 12 comments

Population Lines Print

Population Lines Print

Price includes postage and packaging (all prices GBP(£)), please select your regionUK 24World 26 I recently produced a map entitled “Population Lines”, which shows population density by latitude. The aim was to achieve a simple and fresh perspective on these well-known data. I have labelled a few key cities for orientation purposes but I’ve left off most of the conventional cartographical adornments. I am really pleased with the end result not least because it resembles Joy Division’s iconic Unknown Pleasures album cover, which in itself is a great example of data visualisation as art. The data, from NASA SEDAC, have been mapped many times before and in many beautiful ways but none seem to me quite as compelling as the simple approach here of using only black and grey lines across the page. What amazes me about this map (from where I sit in London) is just how jagged the lines become throughout India, East China, Indonesia and Japan in comparison to “the West” – evidence that we are definitely in the “Asian...

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Posted by on Jun 3, 2013 in Spatial Analysis, Video, Visualisation | 2 comments

Connected States of America

Connected States of America

Mobile phone data represent one of the “Big Data” frontiers due to their huge volume and the depth of behavioural insights they offer. One illustration of this is the MIT Senseable City lab’s “The Connected States of America” project  that reveals emerging communities based on their social interactions through the use of anonymised mobile phone data. One of the most interesting aspects of this visualisation and its associated analysis is the interaction between the calls and traditional conceptions of US population geography (based on State...

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Posted by on Apr 26, 2012 in London, Media, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 1 comment

Sensing the City: Mapping London’s Population Flows

Sensing the City: Mapping London’s Population Flows

I recently had the pleasure of presenting at the first Data Visualisation London Meetup event where I spoke about some of work we do at UCL CASA. A fair chunk of the slides were movies so I thought it best to stick them in a blog post. If you like what you see you can sign up for the CASA masters course or check out our other blogs. First up was my interactive surname map of London.  I used this to demonstrate that “Big Data” (the general theme of the meetup) is nothing new (we have collected large- scale population data for over a century) and that we can use visualisation to demonstrate complex data. Next, was the now famous animation of London’s transport flows produced by Joan Serras. I then went on to say that we can begin to build more sophisticated maps of public transport by utilising routing algorithms. We took this approach to map the 114 thousand or so bus trips in London each day. I then showed...

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Posted by on Feb 16, 2011 in Featured Maps, London, R Spatial, Visualisation | 6 comments

Mapping London’s Population Change 1801-2030

Mapping London’s Population Change 1801-2030

Buried in the London Datastore are the population estimates for each of the London Boroughs between 2001 – 2030. They predict a declining population for most boroughs with the exception of a few to the east. I was surprised by this general decline and also the numbers involved- I expected larger changes from one year to the next. I think this is because my perception of migration is of the volume of people moving rather than the net effects on the baseline population of these movements. I don’t envy the GLA for making predictions so far into the future, but can understand why they have to do it (think how long it took initiate Crossrail!). Last year I produced a simple animation showing past changes in London’s population density (data) and it provides a nice comparison to the above. In total I have squeezed 40 maps on this page! Technical Stuff These maps were all produced to demonstrate the mapping capabilities of R. The first uses ggplot2 (plus classInt + RColorBrewer) and is based on some code...

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Posted by on Jan 10, 2011 in Resources, Visualisation | 5 comments

R interface to Google Chart Tools

R interface to Google Chart Tools

Hans Rosling eat your heart out! It is now possible to interface R statistics software to Google’s Gapminder inspired Chart Tools. The plots below were produced using the googleVis R package and three datasets from the Gapminder website. The first shows the relationship between income, life expectancy and population for 20 countries with the highest life expectancy in 1979 and the bottom plot shows the countries with the lowest 1979 life expectancy. Press play to see how the countries have faired over the past 50 years. You can also change the variables represented on each axes, the colours and the variable that controls the size of the bubbles. Data: all_date, Chart ID: MotionChart_2011-01-10-10-16-25 R version 2.12.1 (2010-12-16), Google Terms of Use Data: all_date, Chart ID: MotionChart_2011-01-10-10-10-46 R version 2.12.1 (2010-12-16), Google Terms of Use It was a bit fiddly to get the data formatted correctly and I couldn’t manage to get the complete dataset in one plot because my browser kept crashing (Chrome is best). Even with these teething...

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