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Posted by on Oct 16, 2013 in Featured Maps, London, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 0 comments

Open Data as Art: Data Windows

Open Data as Art: Data Windows

Ollie O’Brien and I have just dropped off our invited artwork to the  10X10 “Drawing the City London” project run by the building design charity Article 25. We are amongst a number of (much higher profile) contributors who have donated works to be auctioned on behalf of the charity in November to raise funds for the charity’s projects. The works will also be exhibited beforehand (keep an eye here for details). In spite of an increasing range of more abstract art and print projects on the go,  Ollie and I chose to play to our strengths by producing several maps from the 2011 Census. These covered East London since it was the project’s area of focus this year. The resulting artwork is completely based on open data (and was almost entirely produced with opensource software (QGIS)), licensed under the Open Government Licence.   A single physical copy was printed directly onto white canvas (thanks to Miles Irving at the Drawing Office in UCL Geography). Let’s hope it catches the bidders’ attention!...

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Posted by on Jun 3, 2013 in Featured Maps, Slideshow, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 8 comments

Mapped: London’s Fire Engine Callouts

Mapped: London’s Fire Engine Callouts

This map shows the geography of fire engine callouts across London between January and September 2011. Each of the 144,000 or so lines represents a fire engine (pump) attending an incident (rounded to the nearest 100m) and they have been coloured according to the broad type of incident attended. These incident types have been further broken down in the bar chart on the bottom right. False alarms (in blue), for example, can be malicious (fortunately these are fairly rare), genuine or triggered by an automatic fire alarm (AFA). As the map shows, false alarms – thanks I guess to AFAs in office buildings – seem most common in central London. Actual fires occupy fewer fire engines than false alarms and other services (such as road traffic collisions (RTCs) and flooding), but as one might expect they appear to be a greater part of the incidents attended in more residential areas. As this map demonstrates, the London Fire Brigade deals with a huge number of incidents, and it is great that they...

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Posted by on Aug 17, 2012 in Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 2 comments

In Maps We Trust

In Maps We Trust

Of all the different types of data visualisation, maps* seem to have the best reputation. I think people are much less likely to trust a pie chart, for example, than a map. In a sense, this is amazing given that all maps are abstractions from reality.  They can never tell the whole truth and are nearly all based on data with some degree of uncertainty that will vary over large geographic areas. An extreme interpretation of this view is that all maps are wrong- in which case we shouldn’t bother making them. A more moderate view (and the one I take) is that maps are never perfect so we need to create and use them responsibly – not making them at all would make us worse off. This responsibility criterion is incredibly important because of the high levels of belief people have in maps. You have to ask: What are the consequences of the map you have made? Now that maps are easier than ever to produce, they risk...

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Posted by on Jul 19, 2012 in Featured Maps, London, Slideshow, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 27 comments

Lives on the Line: Life Expectancy and Child Poverty as a Tube Map

Lives on the Line: Life Expectancy and Child Poverty as a Tube Map

Maps have always been a powerful way of  highlighting London’s social inequalities (Charles Booth‘s and John Snow‘s are the most iconic examples of this) and they continue to show how the richest and poorest Londoners often live side by side.  As the BBC’s “The Secret History of Our Streets” has demonstrated, stark inequalities in the wealth and health of Londoners have existed for centuries and, sadly, persist to the present day. A popular way of describing some of the inequalities is to use the analogy that a year in life expectancy is lost for every station eastbound on the Jubilee Line between Westminster and Canning Town. Since first hearing this a few years ago I have wanted to make a map for the rest of the Transport for London network. I have finally done this and you can view the interactive version here and read a more in depth article in the journal Environment and Planning A. The map shows two key statistics: 1) the life expectancy at birth of...

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Posted by on Feb 16, 2011 in Featured Maps, London, R Spatial, Visualisation | 6 comments

Mapping London’s Population Change 1801-2030

Mapping London’s Population Change 1801-2030

Buried in the London Datastore are the population estimates for each of the London Boroughs between 2001 – 2030. They predict a declining population for most boroughs with the exception of a few to the east. I was surprised by this general decline and also the numbers involved- I expected larger changes from one year to the next. I think this is because my perception of migration is of the volume of people moving rather than the net effects on the baseline population of these movements. I don’t envy the GLA for making predictions so far into the future, but can understand why they have to do it (think how long it took initiate Crossrail!). Last year I produced a simple animation showing past changes in London’s population density (data) and it provides a nice comparison to the above. In total I have squeezed 40 maps on this page! Technical Stuff These maps were all produced to demonstrate the mapping capabilities of R. The first uses ggplot2 (plus classInt + RColorBrewer) and is based on some code...

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