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Posted by on Jun 26, 2013 in Featured Maps, Media, Slideshow, Visualisation | 0 comments

Updated: Colonial Shipping Routes

Updated: Colonial Shipping Routes

One of the most popular set of maps I produced last year showed English, Spanish and French Shipping between 1750-1800. I am pleased to say it has been revamped and published in a book entitled “The Infographic History of the World“. Valentina D’Efilippo did the redesign from the basic maps I created to put all three maps on a single page and James Ball provided the text. “A project looking at climate change in the world’s oceans gathered an array of location information from the logbooks of British (yellow), Spanish (red) and Dutch (green) ships between 1750 and 1850 – and James Cheshire of University College, London, assembled the first 50 years of that information into this amazing graphic. It tells us that all three nations were eager and frequent travellers between the old and new worlds for trade, but while Spain frequented both North and South America, the Dutch stuck largely to the South (and the Caribbean), and the British focused far more on the North.” If you...

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Posted by on Jun 10, 2013 in R Spatial, Resources | 13 comments

Where is the R Activity?

Where is the R Activity?

R has become one of the world’s most widely used statistics and visualisation software packages with an ever growing user community. Thanks to the release of log files containing all hits to http://cran.rstudio.com/ server it is possible to make a map showing the parts of the world with the most active R users (specifically those mostly using the RStudio interface). The USA comes top with 3,045,960 requests to the server between October 2012 and June 2013. Japan is in 2nd place with a mere 756,177 requests and Germany 3rd. In all 203 countries appear in the server logs. I have scaled the map according to the number of server requests made and you can clearly see the dominance of Japan, Europe and North America compared with other parts of the world, especially Africa. The map of course isn’t a perfect representation of the number of R users, as you could have one or two people making hundreds of server requests a day versus a large number of people only making a couple. This is...

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Posted by on Jun 3, 2013 in Featured Maps, Slideshow, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 8 comments

Mapped: London’s Fire Engine Callouts

Mapped: London’s Fire Engine Callouts

This map shows the geography of fire engine callouts across London between January and September 2011. Each of the 144,000 or so lines represents a fire engine (pump) attending an incident (rounded to the nearest 100m) and they have been coloured according to the broad type of incident attended. These incident types have been further broken down in the bar chart on the bottom right. False alarms (in blue), for example, can be malicious (fortunately these are fairly rare), genuine or triggered by an automatic fire alarm (AFA). As the map shows, false alarms – thanks I guess to AFAs in office buildings – seem most common in central London. Actual fires occupy fewer fire engines than false alarms and other services (such as road traffic collisions (RTCs) and flooding), but as one might expect they appear to be a greater part of the incidents attended in more residential areas. As this map demonstrates, the London Fire Brigade deals with a huge number of incidents, and it is great that they...

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Posted by on May 30, 2013 in Featured Maps, London, Slideshow, Visualisation | 2 comments

What’s so Great About a World Flight Paths Map?

What’s so Great About a World Flight Paths Map?

The stunning map depicting global flight paths produced by Michael Markieta has proved extremely popular (over 13k shares on the BBC when I last checked). The data used to create it (from OpenFlights) have been around for years and there have been many maps produced showing the same thing. So what is so great about Michael’s map?  My 3 reasons: 1. Projection I think this is the biggest distinguishing feature of the map. Map projections are extremely important for a number of reasons, but most of the time we are stuck with the Mercator projection (on nearly all web maps) which is pretty rubbish for visualising any kind of human phenomena. Without sounding too technical, Michael has opted for the Robinson (or is it the Winkel-Tripel?) projection. This has better proportioned the world in addition to offering a hint of curvature to give the impression that the flights have been draped over the Earth’s surface a bit like cobwebs. Estelle Lovatt described this on the BBC as the map “not...

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Posted by on Oct 22, 2012 in Featured Maps, London, Slideshow, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 17 comments

Mapped: Twitter Languages in London

Mapped: Twitter Languages in London

  [zoomit id=”IIY6″ width=”auto” height=”400px”] **Update: You can see a new fully-interactive version here** Last year Eric Fischer produced a great map (see end of post) visualising the language communities of Twitter. The map, perhaps unsurprisingly, closely matches the geographic extents of the world’s major linguistic groups. On seeing these broad patterns I wondered how well they applied London- a great international city. The graphic above shows (and here for non-zoom version) the spatial distribution of about 3.3 million geo-located tweets (based on GPS) coloured by the language detected using Google’s translation tools. Ed Manley collected the data and he goes into more detail about the data here. They cover the summer period so we can clearly see the many languages of the Olympic Park (a hotspot for tweeting). English tweets (grey) dominate (unsurprisingly) and they provide crisp outlines to roads and train lines as people tweet on the move. Towards the north, more Turkish tweets (blue) appear, Arabic tweets (green) are most common around Edgware Road and there are pockets of...

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