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Posted by on Jan 7, 2011 in Featured Maps, London, Visualisation | 4 comments

Boris Bikes/Barclays Cycle Hire Average Journey Times

Boris Bikes/Barclays Cycle Hire Average Journey Times

The visualisation above shows the average relative duration of Boris Bikers’ weekday journeys over a 4 month period at hourly intervals. For each time step the average journey time (in seconds) from each docking station has been calculated.This information is interesting because it shows the preference for short journeys around the City of London, whilst people on the outskirts of the the scheme (especially to the west) take longer journeys. I also like the the fact that journey times around Soho and the West End are longest around 23:00- perhaps correlating with the number of after-work drinks consumed. In one visualisation you get to see the changes in the cyclists behaviour- from the early morning commuters through to the late night cruisers The data come from Transport for London’s recent release of 1.4 million Barclays Cycle Hire journeys to their developers area (thanks to this FOI request). The data are said include all the journeys between 30 July 2010 and 3 November 2010, except those starting between midnight and...

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Posted by on Jan 2, 2011 in Resources, Visualisation | 1 comment

Geographical Mistakes: Keeping Geographers Busy

Geographical Mistakes: Keeping Geographers Busy

This is a cross post from Hodder Geography’s Expert Blog. As geographers we try to better understand the world, and I believe one of our most important skills is the ability to apply a map’s representation of the world to reality. This can range from basic navigation using a paper map to understanding the impacts that climate change will have on people if model predictions are correct. That’s not to say we don’t ever make mistakes. Some are amusing, whilst others can have serious implications. Google, for example, have accidentally become involved in the dispute between Nicaragua and Costa Rica by drawing an incorrect border between the two countries. Google’s maps get scrutinised by thousands of people each hour so mistakes are unlikely to go unnoticed. The city of Sunrise in Florida, for example, was lost on Google Maps. This caused a great deal of concern for residents, one local commented, “It felt like a bizarre novel…We woke up one morning and we didn’t exist in the ether world!”....

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Posted by on Dec 10, 2010 in Visualisation | 0 comments

Creating Regions from Social Relationships

Creating Regions from Social Relationships

The video above accompanies interesting research, led by the MIT SENSEable City Lab, that shows how the linkages between landline calls in the UK can be used to create a “new” regional geography. The main conclusion I drew from the map is the fact that people phone those nearest to them more than those further away; but this is unsurprising. To me, the map is important for two reasons. Firstly, it is an excellent example of our data rich culture and our ability to use this data for meaningful analysis. Not so long ago the clustering of 12 billion phone calls would have been a laughable undertaking. The second outcome is the demonstration of the fact that we no longer need to rely on arbitrary administrative boundaries in our data analysis, we are increasingly able to create our own data-based geographies. Thanks to Jon Reades (one of the project researchers) for alerting me to this...

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Posted by on Aug 22, 2010 in Resources | 0 comments

How to…do geography

How to…do geography

When I was digging around some back-up files on my computer I came across this “How to…” published by the Guardian Newspaper in 2007. With many new geography students starting their respective courses in the coming weeks and many potential students considering applications to the subject in the coming months this may prove a useful guide. It’s a pretty good summary of the discipline (although I don’t know many human geographers interested in trams and of course there is no mention of GIS).  Click here, or image, for full size. In case you were wondering, to my knowledge, geographers still haven’t worked out why the sea fits so snugly around the coastline… Before I dust down my corduroy jacket in preparation for the geography conference season, the article reminds me of the “what is geography?” question I prepared an answer for when applying for my undergrad. degree. If only I had thought of an answer as concise as Starbucks… Photo from Isla...

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Posted by on Jul 2, 2010 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The UCL Geography ESRI Development Center

The UCL Geography ESRI Development Center

UCL Department of Geography is proud to be an ESRI Development Center (or Centre). Each year we have to submit a report that outlines the past year’s activities. We have had another busy year hosting two visiting professors (Prof. Keith Clarke and Prof. Keiji Yano), receiving over 1 million visits to our research blogs and outreach websites and helping to organize the AGI Education Keynote given by Jack Dangermond. EDC researchers have presented over 20 conference papers and published in over 20 peer reviewed journals. My own contribution is shown on this blog and my slideshare account. For those who want to know in more detail about the UCL Geography EDC activities the full report can be downloaded...

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