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Posted by on Aug 12, 2013 in Spatial Analysis | 0 comments

Big Open Data: Mining and Synthesis

Big Open Data: Mining and Synthesis

I have just been awarded and ESRC Future Research Leaders grant entitled “Big Open Data: Mining and Synthesis” (BODMAS). The project is an exciting opportunity to start to get to grips with the latest developments in geographic data for the social sciences. The award will enable me to employ a researcher (job spec out soon!) to work with the latest datasets and create a number of tools and visualisations to aid in their analysis. Another key aspect of the grant is the personal development component so I am fortunate to have the chance to work with great researchers at other universities and my academic mentor, Michael Batty. I will still be based at the UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis and will be taking a break from teaching to work on the project. I plan to keep spatial.ly updated with project developments once it begins in...

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Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in London, Resources, Spatial Analysis, Video | 0 comments

Role of CyberGIS in Analysing Urban Data

Role of CyberGIS in Analysing Urban Data

This is a talk a gave in August 2012 on the use of “CyberGIS” for the analysis of urban data. CyberGIS is a term that covers the suit of tools that are being developed to use large-scale computing infrastructures for geographic data analysis. In my talk I demonstrate the ways that we at CASA have been grappling with the “big data” of cities ranging from transport to social...

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Posted by on Feb 20, 2013 in Featured Maps, R Spatial, Slideshow, Visualisation | 7 comments

Mapped: Twitter Languages in New York

Mapped: Twitter Languages in New York

Following the interest in our Twitter Tongues map for London, Ed Manley and I have teamed up with Trendsmap creator John Barratt to offer this snapshot of New York City’s Twitter languages. We have visualised the geography of about 8.5 million geo-located tweets collected between Jan 2010 and Feb 2013. Each tweet is marked by a slightly transparent dot coloured according to the language it was written in. Language was detected using Google’s translation tools. The above map (click for interactive version courtesy of Oliver O’Brien) has the top ten languages plotted together and the one below takes the top 24 in turn (excluding English) and orders them by popularity. English (in grey above) is by far the most popular with Spanish (in blue above) taking the top spot amongst the other language groups.  Portuguese and Japanese take third and fourth respectively. Midtown Manhattan and JFK International Airport have, perhaps unsurprisingly, the most linguistically diverse tweets whilst specific languages shine through in places such as Brighton Beach (Russian), the Bronx (Spanish) and towards Newark (Portuguese). You can also...

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Posted by on Jul 9, 2012 in Resources, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 0 comments

Editorial: Visualisation Tools for Understanding Big Data

Editorial: Visualisation Tools for Understanding Big Data

I recently co-wrote an editorial (download the full version here) with Mike Batty (UCL CASA) in which we explored some of the current issues surrounding the visualisation of large urban datasets. We were inspired to write it following the CASA Smart Cities conference and we included a couple of visualisations I have blogged here. Much of the day was devoted to demonstrating the potential of data visualisation to help us better understand our cities. Such visualisations would not have been possible a few years ago using desktop computers their production has ballooned as a result of recent technological (and in the case of OpenData, political) advances. In the editorial we argue that the many new visualisations, such as the map of London bus trips above, share much in common with the work of early geographers and explorers whose interests were in the description of often-unknown processes. In this context, the unknown has been the ability to produce a large-scale impression of the dynamics of London’s bus network. The pace of exploration is largely determined by...

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