Pages Menu
TwitterRss
Categories Menu

Posted by on Jul 27, 2013 in Featured Maps, London, Media, Slideshow, Visualisation | 0 comments

Crime Map of London

Crime Map of London

I was delighted to be asked to be part of the the Financial Times Magazine’s special graphics issue. It is a really great “celebration of visual culture” and includes an interview with Edward Tufte and work from Stamen. The map I produced takes the street-level crime data from the data.police.uk website and shows, the most frequent crime types across London. As the map shows there are some interesting patterns as the city becomes increasingly residential away from the centre. I was keen not to do a “murder map” or “stabbings vs guns” or any number of other variants on these themes because, although each incident is a tragedy, the chances of Londoners being affected by them are thankfully relatively small. The FT interactive team has also produced an interactive version from the data here. I really enjoyed working on the project and its great to see how it turned out. If its not to late, I would recommend you pick up a copy of this weekend’s FT to check out...

Read More

Posted by on Jul 2, 2013 in Video, Visualisation | 2 comments

Mapping Spanish Spending

Mapping Spanish Spending

Access to credit/ debit card data is, quite rightly, heavily restricted, so there aren’t many data visualisations out there that can match the detail of the one above, produced at the MIT Senseable City lab. It shows how Spanish spending patterns vary both geographically and temporally in the run up to...

Read More

Posted by on Jun 26, 2013 in Featured Maps, Media, Slideshow, Visualisation | 0 comments

Updated: Colonial Shipping Routes

Updated: Colonial Shipping Routes

One of the most popular set of maps I produced last year showed English, Spanish and French Shipping between 1750-1800. I am pleased to say it has been revamped and published in a book entitled “The Infographic History of the World“. Valentina D’Efilippo did the redesign from the basic maps I created to put all three maps on a single page and James Ball provided the text. “A project looking at climate change in the world’s oceans gathered an array of location information from the logbooks of British (yellow), Spanish (red) and Dutch (green) ships between 1750 and 1850 – and James Cheshire of University College, London, assembled the first 50 years of that information into this amazing graphic. It tells us that all three nations were eager and frequent travellers between the old and new worlds for trade, but while Spain frequented both North and South America, the Dutch stuck largely to the South (and the Caribbean), and the British focused far more on the North.” If you...

Read More

Posted by on Jun 17, 2013 in Video, Visualisation | 1 comment

Geneva’s Mobile Phone Traces

Geneva’s Mobile Phone Traces

This stunning animation was produced as part of the Ville Vivante project that utilised data collected from mobile phone connections to create these digital traces across the city of Geneva. Mobile phones create a wealth of “invisible” data that is only really accessible to a few people. This animation coud be recreated for any city and therefore offers some insights into one aspect of our digital signatures that is often...

Read More

Posted by on Jun 10, 2013 in London, Video, Visualisation | 0 comments

London Cycle Hire Tails

London Cycle Hire Tails

Whilst this animation, produced by Jo Wood at City University, is a really nice representation of  the five million Barclays Cycle Hire journeys made in 2010/11 in central London, its main purpose is to show the effect of changing the length of the ‘trail’ left by each journey (starts to increase from 15 seconds into the animation). By changing the prominence given to more common journeys (from 45 seconds onwards), structure emerges from the apparent chaos of journeys. Three major systems become apparent (from 1 minute onwards) – Hyde park to the west, commuting to/from King’s Cross St Pancras to the north and Waterloo to/from the City to the...

Read More

Posted by on Jun 3, 2013 in Featured Maps, Slideshow, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 8 comments

Mapped: London’s Fire Engine Callouts

Mapped: London’s Fire Engine Callouts

This map shows the geography of fire engine callouts across London between January and September 2011. Each of the 144,000 or so lines represents a fire engine (pump) attending an incident (rounded to the nearest 100m) and they have been coloured according to the broad type of incident attended. These incident types have been further broken down in the bar chart on the bottom right. False alarms (in blue), for example, can be malicious (fortunately these are fairly rare), genuine or triggered by an automatic fire alarm (AFA). As the map shows, false alarms – thanks I guess to AFAs in office buildings – seem most common in central London. Actual fires occupy fewer fire engines than false alarms and other services (such as road traffic collisions (RTCs) and flooding), but as one might expect they appear to be a greater part of the incidents attended in more residential areas. As this map demonstrates, the London Fire Brigade deals with a huge number of incidents, and it is great that they...

Read More