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Posted by on Jul 15, 2015 in Featured Maps, Visualisation | 0 comments

#15MinuteMap: Tropical Cyclone Tracks 1842-2014

#15MinuteMap: Tropical Cyclone Tracks 1842-2014

More and more I stumble across really cool datasets online that are crying out to be mapped, but I never seem to have the time to do anything fun with them. I had a spare 15 minutes yesterday and challenged myself to map something. I wanted to map tropical cyclones – you can see the result below. I think my map is a good start, but it was never going to be perfect in 15 minutes. For example, it would benefit from a few more tweaks and a little more time spent adding labels, picking out interesting storm tracks and so on. That said, I surprised myself that I was able to do anything in 15 minutes – it felt a bit like the cartographic equivalent of arriving home hungry and throwing a quick meal together from what’s left in the fridge. It would be great to see what others can do – use the hashtag #15MinuteMap to share on Twitter! How I did my map: Data formatting is time consuming...

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Posted by on May 9, 2015 in Featured Maps, Visualisation | 2 comments

Colour of Votes: 2015 General Election

Colour of Votes: 2015 General Election

There have been many great interactive maps and graphics produced for the 2015 General Election. A map I haven’t seen though is one that attempts to show the relative strength of support for each party in each constituency. This is what the map above seeks to achieve. The principle is simple – you have 3 buckets of paint – one red, one green, one blue – and you mix them together based on the vote share of each party. So a strong Conservative win gets lots of blue paint and relatively little from the other two, whilst split in support across parties will result in a more muddy colour as all three paints get mixed together in similar amounts. As an extra step I also rescaled the size of each area by the number of people who voted there to help show cities, especially London, more clearly. Of course, this map falls a little short of revealing the most interesting results of the election since they mostly occurred in the green...

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Posted by on Mar 30, 2015 in R Spatial, Resources, Spatial Analysis, Visualisation | 9 comments

Mapping Flows in R

Mapping Flows in R

Last year I published the above graphic, which then got converted into the below for the book London: The Information Capital. I have had many requests for the code I used to create the plot so here it is! The data shown is the Office for National Statistics flow data. See here for the latest version. The file I used for the above can be downloaded here (it is >109 mb uncompressed so you need a decent computer to load/plot it all at once in R). You will also need this file of area (MSOA) codes and their co-ordinates. The code used is pasted below with comments above each segment. Good luck! library(plyr) library(ggplot2) library(maptools) Load the flow data required – origin and destination points are needed. See above for where you can get the table used here. input<-read.table("wu03ew_v1.csv", sep=",", header=T) We only need the first 3 columns of the above input names(input) The UK Census file above didn’t have coordinates just area codes. Here is a lookup that provides...

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Posted by on Mar 29, 2015 in London, Visualisation | 0 comments

Burger Cartography

Burger Cartography

  I enjoy burgers and have a passion for maps and mapping, which is probably why Andrew Hill’s recent blog post “In Defense of Burger Cartography” offered a sufficiently large piece of bait for me to bite on and respond to (I join Kenneth Field and Taylor Shelton [and others, I am sure] in his cartographers’ keepnet) . In summary, the post says its time to “fall in love with maps all over again” thanks to a “new world of cartography” that has been liberated from old world critiques. I agree with many of Andrew’s points – it’s good to make it easy for people to make maps, traditional cartography can seem a bit crusty in this “new age” of so-called “Big Data” and web mapping, the more people who enjoy maps the better etc. etc. – but I have a few thoughts of my own to add. Firstly, I’m all for “exploratory playfulness” but I am more for thinking critically. Twitter maps are a key example in Andrew’s post – why get hung up...

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Posted by on Mar 9, 2015 in Featured Maps, Slideshow, Visualisation | 0 comments

Print Mega Sale

Print Mega Sale

I am moving house so I want to get as many of my remaining prints to a new home before I have to leave for mine. I am therefore selling them off as cheaply as possible (UK: £16, World:£18, including postage). These prints will not be signed or numbered (as they have been in the past), but they are the same high quality paper and size (A2) as I have been selling all along here. Price includes postage and packaging (all prices GBP(£)), please select your regionUK 16World 18...

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Posted by on Dec 11, 2014 in London, Visualisation | 0 comments

OpenStreetMappers of London

OpenStreetMappers of London

This is a slightly edited cross post from Oliver O’Brien’s Suprageography blog. It offers a behind the scenes look at one of the graphics we created for the opening essay in London: The Information Capital. From Ollie: I contributed a number of graphics to LONDON: The Information Capital, a book co-written by Dr James Cheshire, also of UCL Geography. Two of my graphics that made it into the book were based on data from OpenStreetMap, a huge dataset of spatial data throughout the world. One of the graphics, featured in this post, forms one of the chapter intro pages, and colours all the roads, streets and paths in the Greater London Authority area (around 160,000 “ways” which are discrete sections of road/path) according to the person who most recently updated them. Over 1500 indivdual users helped create and refine the map, and all are featured here. I was pleased to discover I was the 21st most prolific, with 1695 ways most recently modified by myself at the time that...

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